PROGRAM

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2020

START TIME

END TIME

EVENT

8:00 AM

9:00 AM

9:15 AM

10:00 AM

10:45 AM

11:00 AM

11:45 AM

12:30 PM

1:30 PM

2:15 PM

3:00 PM

3:15 PM

9:00 AM

9:15 AM

10:00AM

10:45 AM

11:00 AM

11:45 AM

12:30 PM

1:30 PM

2:15 PM

3:00 PM

3:15 PM

4:00 PM

Registration

Opening Remarks

Keynote Address 1

Concurrent Sessions 1

Refreshment Break

Concurrent Sessions 2

Concurrent Sessions 3

Lunch 

Concurrent Sessions 4

Concurrent Sessions 5

Refreshment Break

Concurrent Sessions 6

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2020

EVENT

END TIME

START TIME

8:00 AM

9:00 AM

9:15 AM

10:00 AM

10:45 AM

11:00 AM

11:45 AM

12:30 PM

1:30 PM

2:15 PM

3:00 PM

3:15 PM

9:00 AM

9:15 AM

10:00AM

10:45 AM

11:00 AM

11:45 AM

12:30 PM

1:30 PM

2:15 PM

3:00 PM

3:15 PM

4:00 PM

Registration

Opening Remarks

Keynote Address 2

Concurrent Sessions 7

Refreshment Break

Concurrent Sessions 8

Concurrent Sessions 9

Lunch 

Concurrent Sessions 10

Concurrent Sessions 11

Refreshment Break

Concurrent Sessions 12

*Please note that a detailed print copy of the conference program will be included in packages provided to all participants. 

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Great Lakes Water Levels:  Past, Present, and Future

Dr. Andrew D. Gronewold, Physical Scientist

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Water levels of the Great Lakes fluctuate in response to a variety of factors, including changes in precipitation, runoff, and evaporation.  Over shorter time periods, water levels fluctuate in response to changes in wind speed and direction (among other factors).  Over the past two decades, Great Lakes water levels have reached extreme highs and lows, raising important questions about differentiating drivers of water level variability and the relative significance of long term trends.  In this presentation, Dr. Gronewold will provide an overview of historical water level data across the Great Lakes, including an analysis of recent historic water level extremes.  His presentation will also include a discussion of Great Lakes water level forecasting across daily, seasonal, and multi-decadal time scales.

Tuesday, May 12, 2020 - 9:15am

Great Lakes Water Levels:  Past, Present, and Future

Dr. Andrew D. Gronewold, Physical Scientist

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Water levels of the Great Lakes fluctuate in response to a variety of factors, including changes in precipitation, runoff, and evaporation.  Over shorter time periods, water levels fluctuate in response to changes in wind speed and direction (among other factors).  Over the past two decades, Great Lakes water levels have reached extreme highs and lows, raising important questions about differentiating drivers of water level variability and the relative significance of long term trends.  In this presentation, Dr. Gronewold will provide an overview of historical water level data across the Great Lakes, including an analysis of recent historic water level extremes.  His presentation will also include a discussion of Great Lakes water level forecasting across daily, seasonal, and multi-decadal time scales.

Wednesday, May 13, 2020 - 9:15am

CONCURRENT SESSIONS

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2020

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 1 - 10:00 AM

Love Your Greats: The search for environmental optimism

Jen Pate, Co-Founder

Love Your Greats

What does it take to motivate people to actively care for their environment? In most cases, it is personal experience and connection that creates the foundation for our actions. If we don't feel a sense of care for something, we won't take the actions necessary to protect it. Through her experience on the Oceans and the Great Lakes, Jen is sharing a love story - a unique one of people's passion for their local waterways and their willingness to instigate meaningful change for a healthier future. Join her for a session which explores plastic pollution as an illustration of our interconnectedness with the world around us and how we navigate the space between environmental degradation and optimism.

The changing ecology and fish communities of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay

Arunas Liskauskas, Management Biologist

Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Upper Great Lakes Management Unit

The Lake Huron aquatic ecosystem has experienced profound changes to the composition and dynamics of its fish communities. Most of these recent changes are a consequence of the continued introduction of invasive exotic species which have altered food webs, affecting the most minute plankton species as well as top predatory fishes. We will review the historic legacy of changes in the lake and highlight contemporary developments that range from tentative steps towards native species recovery to the ongoing proliferation of exotic species, habitat alteration and climate change.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 2 - 11:00 AM

Digging into litter data: From shoreline cleanups to solutions

Susan Debreceni, Outreach Specialist

Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup

Since 1994, the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup has engaged more than 700,000 Canadians and removed over 1.2 million kg of litter through volunteer-led local shoreline cleanups. This national cleanup is a conservation partnership by Ocean Wise and WWF-Canada and is one of the largest direct action conservation programs in Canada. Global contamination of plastic litter in our rivers, lakes and oceans has negatively impacted hundreds of species due to ingestion and entanglement. From the long-term data that our volunteers have collected, we see an emerging trend that the majority of items found on shorelines fall within the category of single-use plastics. For the first time in the history of the shoreline cleanup, the top item reported in 2017 was tiny plastics and foam (333,289), indicative that this is a material found in high numbers but also that awareness of this material is growing. This dataset adds a powerful layer to driving solutions towards minimizing the amount of plastics in our aquatic ecosystems and there are clear examples of citizen science data being used to inform local changes.

Clean water and a healthy ecosystem within the Pine River watershed: Celebrating ten years of community driven environmental stewardship

Emily Martin, Projects Coordinator

Pine River Watershed Initiative Network

The Pine River Watershed Initiative Network recently celebrated ten years of incorporation as a non-profit organization. We have grown from a small kitchen-table group taking on smaller tree planting projects, to an organization that in 2018 alone will plant over 25,000 seedlings, build three livestock river crossings, install over four kilometers of livestock exclusion fencing, and construct five water and sediment control berms. Project Coordinator Emily Martin will discuss the factors that have allowed PRWIN to succeed as an organization, and will highlight a number of the most prominent environmental concerns in the Pine River watershed as well as the past and future PRWIN projects and programs that combat these issues.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 3 - 11:45 AM

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

Is it safe to swim in the lake and play in the sand?: E. coli and beaches

Dr. Allan Crowe, Science Advisor

Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation

 

Nothing can spoil your day at the beach more than finding that your beach has been posted with an advisory against swimming for health issues. The bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) is frequently found in the lake water adjacent to all beaches along the shores of the Great Lakes during the summer, and often at levels than result in municipalities posting warnings and/or closures to swimming. But the lake water is not the only place that this bacteria is found.  E. coli is also present in the beach sand adjacent to the shore, and often at levels many times higher than the lake water. The presence of E. coli at beaches is caused by both natural factors and activities of local residents. This presentation will discuss the sources of the E. coli, its health risks, what beach residents can do to reduce levels of E.coli in both lake water and beach sand.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 4 - 1:30 PM

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 5 - 2:15 PM

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 6 - 3:15 PM

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2020

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 7 - 10:00 AM

Love Your Greats: The search for environmental optimism

Jen Pate, Co-Founder

Love Your Greats

What does it take to motivate people to actively care for their environment? In most cases, it is personal experience and connection that creates the foundation for our actions. If we don't feel a sense of care for something, we won't take the actions necessary to protect it. Through her experience on the Oceans and the Great Lakes, Jen is sharing a love story - a unique one of people's passion for their local waterways and their willingness to instigate meaningful change for a healthier future. Join her for a session which explores plastic pollution as an illustration of our interconnectedness with the world around us and how we navigate the space between environmental degradation and optimism.

The changing ecology and fish communities of Lake Huron and Georgian Bay

Arunas Liskauskas, Management Biologist

Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Upper Great Lakes Management Unit

The Lake Huron aquatic ecosystem has experienced profound changes to the composition and dynamics of its fish communities. Most of these recent changes are a consequence of the continued introduction of invasive exotic species which have altered food webs, affecting the most minute plankton species as well as top predatory fishes. We will review the historic legacy of changes in the lake and highlight contemporary developments that range from tentative steps towards native species recovery to the ongoing proliferation of exotic species, habitat alteration and climate change.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 8 - 11:00 AM

Digging into litter data: From shoreline cleanups to solutions

Susan Debreceni, Outreach Specialist

Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup

Since 1994, the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup has engaged more than 700,000 Canadians and removed over 1.2 million kg of litter through volunteer-led local shoreline cleanups. This national cleanup is a conservation partnership by Ocean Wise and WWF-Canada and is one of the largest direct action conservation programs in Canada. Global contamination of plastic litter in our rivers, lakes and oceans has negatively impacted hundreds of species due to ingestion and entanglement. From the long-term data that our volunteers have collected, we see an emerging trend that the majority of items found on shorelines fall within the category of single-use plastics. For the first time in the history of the shoreline cleanup, the top item reported in 2017 was tiny plastics and foam (333,289), indicative that this is a material found in high numbers but also that awareness of this material is growing. This dataset adds a powerful layer to driving solutions towards minimizing the amount of plastics in our aquatic ecosystems and there are clear examples of citizen science data being used to inform local changes.

Clean water and a healthy ecosystem within the Pine River watershed: Celebrating ten years of community driven environmental stewardship

Emily Martin, Projects Coordinator

Pine River Watershed Initiative Network

The Pine River Watershed Initiative Network recently celebrated ten years of incorporation as a non-profit organization. We have grown from a small kitchen-table group taking on smaller tree planting projects, to an organization that in 2018 alone will plant over 25,000 seedlings, build three livestock river crossings, install over four kilometers of livestock exclusion fencing, and construct five water and sediment control berms. Project Coordinator Emily Martin will discuss the factors that have allowed PRWIN to succeed as an organization, and will highlight a number of the most prominent environmental concerns in the Pine River watershed as well as the past and future PRWIN projects and programs that combat these issues.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 9 - 11:45 AM

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

Is it safe to swim in the lake and play in the sand?: E. coli and beaches

Dr. Allan Crowe, Science Advisor

Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation

 

Nothing can spoil your day at the beach more than finding that your beach has been posted with an advisory against swimming for health issues. The bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) is frequently found in the lake water adjacent to all beaches along the shores of the Great Lakes during the summer, and often at levels than result in municipalities posting warnings and/or closures to swimming. But the lake water is not the only place that this bacteria is found.  E. coli is also present in the beach sand adjacent to the shore, and often at levels many times higher than the lake water. The presence of E. coli at beaches is caused by both natural factors and activities of local residents. This presentation will discuss the sources of the E. coli, its health risks, what beach residents can do to reduce levels of E.coli in both lake water and beach sand.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 10 - 1:30 PM

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 11 - 2:15 PM

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

CONCURRENT SESSIONS 12 - 3:15 PM

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

Charting a renewed course for Fathom Five National Marine Park

Megan Myles, Visitor Experience Product Development Officer

Parks Canada, Fathom Five National Marine Park

Now, thirty years since establishment, Fathom Five National Marine Park is developing a renewed vision that strives to position the park as a leader in marine conservation, a world-class destination for Canadians to experience the Georgian Bay, and a model for sustainable tourism. In 1987, Fathom Five became Canada’s first National Marine Conservation Area (NMCA) and in light of complex governance challenges, the park continues to work towards becoming established in its own right. However, the future is bright as a new, three-person Fathom Five Strategy Team has been tasked with addressing these challenges as well as operational issues associated with increased visitation and tourism pressures. A new management plan is in the works, making for an opportune time to create this renewed vision. Nationally, the government’s restored commitment to the NMCA program, and locally, community efforts towards sustainable tourism, both support Fathom Five’s important cause.

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The Lake Huron Centre for Coastal Conservation

**We have moved!** Our new mailing address: PO Box 477, Goderich, ON, N7A 4C7

Email: coastalcentre@lakehuron.ca

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